Fitchburg State College
Educator Course

Semester: Spring/ Summer Year: 2010



Course Title: Creating Community Service Learning Opportunities in the K-12 Classroom
Graduate Credit:3 graduate credits: 37.5 contact hours.
Meeting Times/Locations:

Instructors: Mr. Raymond Kane, Instructor, Dr. Deborah Brady, facilitator
Telephone:) 978 597 8721 (Kane); 978 597 8713 (Brady)
E-mail: rkane@nmiddlesex.mec.edu;
dbrady@nmiddlesex.mec.edu;
Fax: 978-597-0350

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Creating Community Service Learning Opportunity. CSL is an intentionally designed, project-based instructional strategy. This course is supported by a Community Service-Learning grant from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Classroom teachers will be guided, by Raymond Kane, an experienced CSL teacher leader who has taken high school students to New Orleans, supported local CSL opportunities including; work with local food banks, Heifer International and the MA Department of Children and Family. Teachers from the North Middlesex Regional Schools and other nearby towns will research the impact of CSL on elementary, early adolescents, and high school students.

Also, teachers will research successful CSL projects in Massachusetts, the United States, and throughout the world using the Coverdell World Wise Schools Program. They will visit three nearby Community Service Learning sites including the Overlook Farm, a Heifer International site and explore the resources available to them in various areas of service learning.Finally, each participant will use the nationally developed standards for CSL to develop an embedded curriculum component for a project-based CSL unit in their classrooms and will present their curriculum units to their classmates.As a follow-up during the 2010-2011 school year, teachers will present their units at a community-wide CSL evening and each activity will be placed in a resource book for every students to have.

TEXTS:
Required Text:
Kaye, Cathryn Berger. The Complete Guide to Service Learning:Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic curriculum, and Social Action,2nd edition. Free Spirit Publishing: 2010.
Required participation in discussions on class wiki at http://nmcommunityservicelearning.wikispaces.com/
Required reading from wiki:Phi Delta Kappa Service Learning articles in February 2010, Volume 91, Number 5, “CSL research, the impact of CSL on learners.”
Required (on wiki): K-12 Service Learning Standards for Quality Practice
Texts:
The Teen Guide to Global Action, Barbara A. Lewis, Free Spirit Publishing, 2008
Kids as Planners, Marina Schauffler; KIDS Consortium 2005
Learning Through Service, Cress, Collier, Reitenauer, et al., Stylus, 2005
Service-Learning: From Classroom to Community to Career, Dr. Marie Watkins and Linda Braun, Just Life (an imprint of JIST Publishing) 2005
“Standards of Quality for School-Based and Community-Based Service Learning;” Alliance for Service-Learning in Education Reform, March, 1995
Service Learning: A Guide to Planning, Implementing, and Assessing Student Projects, Sally Berman, Sage Publications, 2006
Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, and Social Action, Cathryn Berger Kaye, Free Spirit Publishing, Revised Edition, 2010.

LEARNING OUTCOMES/OBJECTIVES
This course will address the four dispositions of the FSC Conceptual Framework of the Educator as Reflective Leader:Knowledgeable, Skill, Caring, Ethics

Knowledge:As a result of the learning experiences in the course, you will become more cognizant of:
How to develop units of CSL study that conform to the national K-12 Service Learning Standards for Quality Practice that require organized learning experiences that:
Provide meaningful service for students, that is developmentally appropriate, engaging, and that result in clearly visible outcomes that are valued by those being served.
Directly link to learning goals and content standards. CSL must be used as an intentionally designed, project-based instructional strategy.
Local, national and international CSL projects including the Heifer International Project.

Skill: As a result of the learning experiences in the course, you will become better able to:
Research the needs of the community
Connect student learning to the community around them
Design a project-based CSL unit that provide meaningful service and that connect to the Massachusetts Frameworks
Link local needs of the community to CSL learning experiences
Link students to the local and larger community
Present your research and your unit of study to colleagues and to the local community

Caring: As a result of the learning experiences in the course, you will become more competent in your ability to:
Connect the classroom learning to the needs of the local and larger community
Connect students to their community through CSL
Provide meaningful service for students that is “developmentally appropriate, engaging, and that result in clearly visible outcomes that are valued by those being served.”

Ethical: As a result of the learning experiences in the course, you will become better able to:
Connect student’s experiences in class to the local and larger community
Support students as they serve their community and learn

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
The course will include
Lecture and Presentations by students and teachers who have been involved in CSL, special guests like JP Perkins from Heifer International will be available in order to create a network of possibilities
Discussion and Questioning the various texts and readings completed throughout the course both in the book and resource notebook, in addition, participants will be asked to research their own articles and offer commentary about what they find
Problem Solving by teachers as they research the needs of the community to develop a learning experience that is engaging, developmentally appropriate, and meaningful for students and valued by the recipients of the service.
Discovery of the CSL opportunities available to their students by visiting local services for people in need including Heifer International and in some cases by interviewing CSL participants and community service leaders
Reflective response will be required of participants as they interview students in a panel discussion, visit sites, and research CSL opportunities
Data Collection and analysis used to assess the needs of the community and assess where participants’ chosen projects will fit in to their curricula
Field Trip Explorations will be taken to area services in order to explore what exists in nearby communities
Viewing or Listening to Others Followed by Discussion will take place when CSL participants visit the class and when participants explore sites
Technology will be used by NMRHS students to present their CSL experiences in New Orleans and New York.Participants will post comments and post their projects on the CSL Wiki

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Because the course’s experiences will take place during presentations and field trips during class time, attendance at each class is essential.In addition, the participants’ responses to and reflections these experiences are a central part of the learning in the course. Thus, attendance is mandatory and all missed classes or assignments will have to be made up to receive credit.
Each teacher must build a three-ring binder that includes research on CSL projects that are developmentally appropriate for their students, an annotated bibliography, a journal, a curriculum unit developed to be implemented in 2010-2011.
Participants will present their unit to the class on the last day and will bring their students to the CSL community evening in the spring of 2011
Contributions to wiki discussions include:
CSL, what it is and what it is not
CSL local, national, and international projects
Response each site visit (Heifer International, et al.)
Response to the visit of NMRHS students and panel discussion
Last day of class: Curriculum unit that is meaningful and developmentally appropriate as well as directly linked to Massachusetts Framework content standards and that includes a project-based engagement with a rubric for assessment that is provided to students as they begin the project.
The final exam includes a presentation to the class of a curriculum unit which will be a unit aligned to CSL K-12 Service Learning Standards for Quality Practice.
The instructor’s policy on work handed in late, makeup examinations:All work must be made up within two weeks to receive credit.

Expectations of all students: Each student is responsible for completing all course requirements and for keeping up with all activities of the course whether a student is present or not.

EVALUATION OR GRADING POLICY
Grades will be based upon active participation in the class and the wiki, their three-ring binder that includes their writing and research, and upon the quality of the final unit.

10% Participation
20% Three-ring binder that includes: research, reports, journal, writing all maintained in a three-ring binder
15% Reflections posted to the wiki
25% Final presentation to class
30% CSL Unit

COURSE CONTENT / TOPICAL OUTLINE:
Second Summer Semester:



















1.
















Cress, Collier, Reitenauer
Debrief of site visits for both Ginny’s and Our Father’s House



















Defining Community Service Learning:Students will read and research CSL local, national, and international projects and will present their findings to the class as well as post on the class wiki.
Visiting CSL sites. Students will go on field trips to several CSL sites in the area.
Defining a community need:Students will research the needs of the local community through interviews and readings.
Meeting/Interviewing CSL participants:North Middlesex students who have gone to New Orleans and to New York City to participate in CSL learning will present their experiences to the teachers.Teachers will interview and present their observations to the class and will post their observations on the class wiki.
Developing an effective CSL unit.Based on the needs of the community and the standards of CSL Standards for Quality Practice, participants will be guided through developing an effective CSL unit.

READING AND RESOURCES
Books, software, videos, web sites, required texts:
Required participation in discussions on class wiki at http://nmcommunityservicelearning.wikispaces.com/
Required reading from wiki:Phi Delta Kappa Service Learning articles in February 2010, Volume 91, Number 5 on: CSL research, the impact of CSL on learners.
Required (on wiki): K-12 Service Learning Standards for Quality Practice
DVD
Seeds, Hope and Concrete- Building Communities, Improving Lives; a film about Heifer International’s Urban Agriculture program
12 Stones, a film by Sandy Smolan about Heifer International’s work with illiterate women in Nepal
Websites:
http://www.serve.gov/
http://www.concernusa.org/
http://www.peacecorps.gov/wws/
http://www.heifereducation.org
http://www.tolerance.org/
http://www.heifer.org
Texts and Articles:
The Teen Guide to Global Action; Barbara A. Lewis; Free Spirit Publishing 2008
Kids as Planner; Marina Schauffler; KIDS Consortium 2005
Learning Through Service; Cress, Collier, Reitenauer, et al.; Stylus 2005
Service-Learning- From Classroom to Community to Career; Dr. Marie Watkins and Linda Braun; Just Life (an imprint of JIST Publishing) 2005
Article- “Standards of Quality for School-Based and Community-Based Service Learning;” Alliance for Service-Learning in Education Reform March 1995
Service Learning- a Guide to Planning, Implementing, and Assessing Student Projects; Sally Berman; Sage Publications 2006
Complete Guide to Service Learning- Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, and Social Action; Cathryn Berger Kaye; Free Spirit Publishing, Revised Edition 2010

Rubrics- Service-Learning Standards and Educational Frameworks- Peace Corps Coverdell World Wise Schools

Assessment: The general quality guidelines for writing assignments, reflections, postings on the wiki and the final curriculum unit are:

Advanced: Accurate, coherent application of the principles of the course in work that has been thoughtfully written, briefly and accurately presented to the class, and carefully constructed. The work shows that you clearly understand and apply the knowledge, skills, concern for others, and ethical stance of the course.

Proficient: Mostly accurate, coherent application of the principles of the course in work that has been mainly thoughtfully written, briefly and accurately presented to the class, and generally carefully constructed. . The work shows that you generally understand and apply the knowledge, skills, concern for others, and ethical stance of the course.

Needs Improvement: (Your work will be returned to you and you may improve it (if you choose.) There are some inaccuracies in the application of the principles of the course in work that has been written and presented to the class constructed with inaccuracies or missing elements. The work shows that you do not clearly understand and apply the knowledge, skills, concern for others, and ethical stance of the course.

FITCHBURG STATE COLLEGE, CPS AND EDUCATION UNIT POLICIES

Attendance and Participation
1. As a graduate student, you are expected to attend every class session, to be on time, and to communicate with the instructor regarding any absences. Absences and tardiness may result in a permanent grade change.
2. Participation in class discussions and cooperative groups is expected. All graduate students are responsible for meeting required deadlines on projects and assignments; your ability to complete tasks in a timely fashion demonstrates professional maturity and an ability to organize and manage time. Completion of assigned reading is imperative to your individual development as a professional.
3. All of these behaviors regarding attendance, preparation, and meeting deadlines are critical for successful teaching and thus are factored into the final grade.

Cellular Telephones
Kindly turnoff cellular telephones during class time! For emergency messages please set the telephone device to vibrate. Thank you in advance for your consideration of colleagues and children.

Policy on Honesty
The faculty in the Education Unit at Fitchburg State College that work submitted in fulfillment of course requirements will be solely that of the individual graduate student and all other sources will be cited appropriately. College Academic Dishonesty Policy, as outlined in the College Catalogue, will be strictly adhered to.

Copyright Policy
You are reminded that, in preparing handouts for peers or the instructor, reproduction of copyrighted material without permission of the copyright owner is illegal. Such unauthorized copying may violate the rights of the author or publisher. Fitchburg State College adheres to federal laws regarding use of copyrighted materials. See the Student Handbook for more details.

Fitchburg State College Library and ID Card Information for CPS Students
The GallucciCirio Library at Fitchburg State College provides a full range of library services including borrowing privileges, document delivery (books and articles), Interlibrary Loans, online and toll free phone reference assistance, access to subscription databases, and more. Any questions relating to library services and resources should be directed to the Access Services Librarian at 9786653062 or (toll free within New England) 18883398949 or DLLIBRARY@FSC.EDU. There is also a special section for Distributed Learning Library Services at http://fsc.edu/library/distributed/index.cfm outlining the wide range of services available to you and how to access them. If you need research assistance, contact the
Access Services Librarian or one of our Reference Librarians through our “Ask a Librarian” at
http://fsc.edu/library/ask/index.cfm.

Students who are currently registered with the college may access any of the library’s subscription databases, including an increasing number with full text, by visiting the Gallucci Cirio Library’s homepage at http://www.fsc.edu/library, clicking on the link for “All Research Databases” or “Research Guides for Majors”, and selecting the database they want. If you are off campus, you will be prompted to enter your Falcon Key user ID and password. Your Falcon Key gets you access to the library’s databases, your email account and the Blackboard courseware if your class is online. If you have not received your Falcon Key or it does not work, contact the Information Technology Department at 9786654500.

All registered Fitchburg State College students are eligible for a library account; activate it online at http://www.fsc.edu/librarycf/cardrequest.cfm or in person at the Circulation Desk. Your Fitchburg State One Card also serves as your library card. (To obtain your One Card you must present course registration confirmation at Media Services room 229 in the Conlon Industrial Arts Building of the main campus; please call 9786653039
for available times. Anyone taking classes online or at an extended campus location may request a photoless One Card online at http://www.fsc.edu/onecard/photoless/index.cfm
which will be mailed to them.) After activation by the Gallucci Cirio Library, students may use any Massachusetts State College and University Library during the current semester. Your Banner number is your library barcode. Students are also eligible for a Fitchburg State College email account. Please contact the IUser Services department in room 230 of the Conlon Industrial Arts Building of the main campus or call 9786654500